Medesthetics

OCT 2017

MedEsthetics—business education for medical practitioners—provides the latest noninvasive cosmetic procedures, treatment trends, product and equipment reviews, legal issues and medical aesthetics industry news.

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18 OCTOBER 2017 | Med Esthetics © GETTY IMAGES BUSINESS CONSULT Korean or Russian populations, for example. If you have bilingual staff, let these prospective patients know that you are ready to serve them. WE RUN ON TIME Does your practice offer a guarantee of seeing patients within 10 or 15 minutes of their appointments? That is a big competitive advantage. Offi ces that offer to waive the consultation fee or reduce the treatment price if they run late are telling their patients, "Your time is as valuable as ours." This is a unique service proposition that can gener- ate positive buzz. WE WON'T LEAVE YOU EXPOSED Patients get bruises following injectables—and they are not easy to cover with ordinary makeup. If you offer camoufl age makeup following treatment, that is a big bonus for patients and a unique selling point. Ideally, practices should have a staff member show the patient how to apply the product and then send her home with her own tube of cover-up. COMPREHENSIVE CARE OFFERED HERE Does your aesthetic practice have multiple providers— doctors from multiple specialties, nurse practitioners, estheticians, etc.? If so, you have a unique selling point. Practices that can refer patients in-house and those that collectively gather their teams to review patient consulta- tions and create comprehensive treatment plans offer a real benefi t to patients. Make sure prospective patients know all that you and your team can provide under one roof. WE KNOW YOUR PROFESSION Happy patients refer their friends and acquaintances. And in some cases, this can lead to a trend. If you are in a military town, for example, you may start to notice that you are serving a large number of military wives. Or perhaps you have become the top doc for local fl ight attendants or tele- vision personalities. If you see a growing profession-based population among your patients, share that with prospects so they know that you understand their unique lifestyles, scheduling needs and downtime concerns. IT'S ALL PERSONAL While telling patients that you offer "personalized care" is not particularly unique, practices that go the extra mile to tailor treatments—as well as the treatment experience—to the individual can give themselves an edge. One physi- cian I worked with asks his patients to bring in a picture of themselves from 20, 30 or 40 years ago so he can better assess their individual anatomies and how their faces are aging. Another asks his surgical patients who their favorite band or musician is. While being prepared for surgery and waiting for anesthesia, the patient's—not the surgeon's— favorite music plays in the background. These small details create a memorable experience and are a noteworthy selling point. CONCIERGE SERVICES AVAILABLE Many practices offer concierge services, such as booking hotels and fl ights for patients who live out of town or a visiting nurse for a recovering patient who lives alone. But they don't always share this information unless a prospec- tive patient asks. If your staff is trained to arrange these services, make sure your existing and future patients are aware of this. The goal of every aesthetic provider is to make patients feel special. By stepping back and looking at all the things you and your staff do each day to create a positive and memorable patient experience, you can identify the many unique selling points that will help you differentiate your practice from the competition. Karen Zupko is the president of practice management consultancy Karen Zupko and Associates. Contact her at 312.642.5616, karenzupko.com. Practices that go the extra mile to tailor treatments—as well as the treatment experience—to the individual can give themselves an edge.

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