Medesthetics

ARP 2016

MedEsthetics—business education for medical practitioners—provides the latest noninvasive cosmetic procedures, treatment trends, product and equipment reviews, legal issues and medical aesthetics industry news.

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How to select the right retinoid and retinol products for your acne and antiaging patients. Give 30 APRIL 2016 | MedEsthetics © GETTY IMAGES By Laura Beliz Me An A PRESCRIPTION RETINOIDS, TYPICALLY INDICATED FOR ACNE AND PHOTODAMAGE, come in a variety of formulations and vehicles. With the introduction of cosmeceutical formulations, over-the- counter vitamin A-derivative retinol has become increasingly popular for antiaging concerns as well. "Vitamin A-based retinoids and retinol are important for epidermal proliferation, keratinization and the peeling process," says Rita Pichardo-Geisinger, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "They modify keratin synthesis, sebaceous secretion and the composition of the extracellular matrix. At the dermal level this has an infl uence on fi broblastic proliferation and collagen metabolism." This unique mechanism of action is what has made retinoids such a signifi cant component of skin care; however, their effi cacy does present some downsides. Retinoids do irritate the skin, and long-term, continuous use can cause signs of aging rather than curb them. In order to reap the maximum benefi ts while reducing adverse effects, providers must consider issues such as tolerability, dosage and bioavailability. PRESCRIPTION RETINOIDS, TYPICALLY INDICATED FOR ACNE AND PHOTODAMAGE, come in a variety of formulations and vehicles. With the introduction of cosmeceutical formulations, over-the- counter vitamin A-derivative retinol has become increasingly popular for antiaging concerns as well. "Vitamin A-based retinoids and retinol are important for epidermal proliferation, keratinization and the peeling process," says Rita Pichardo-Geisinger, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "They modify keratin synthesis, sebaceous secretion and the composition of the extracellular matrix. At the dermal level this has an infl uence on fi broblastic proliferation and collagen metabolism." This unique mechanism of action is what has made retinoids such a signifi cant component of skin care; however, their effi cacy does present some downsides. Retinoids do irritate the skin, and long-term, continuous use can cause signs of aging rather than curb them. In order to reap the maximum benefi ts while reducing adverse effects, providers must consider issues such as tolerability, dosage and bioavailability.

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