Medesthetics

APR 2018

MedEsthetics—business education for medical practitioners—provides the latest noninvasive cosmetic procedures, treatment trends, product and equipment reviews, legal issues and medical aesthetics industry news.

Issue link: https://medesthetics.epubxp.com/i/958248

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 48 of 68

UP IN SMOKE 46 APRIL 2018 | MedEsthetics © GETTY IMAGES Because bacteria can stay viable for up to 72 hours in tubing and suction hoses, "wands, fi lters and tubing should be treated as hazardous biocontaminated material and discarded after each use," says Owens. Laser technicians should also use personal protec- tive equipment, such lab coats, laser goggles and gloves to prevent exposure, says George J. Hruza, MD, MBA, adjunct professor of dermatology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. Buffalo Filter, Lancaster, New York, recommends the fol- lowing smoke evacuator cleaning and disposal practices. Smoke evacuator units 1. Unplug the surgical smoke evacuator. 2. Wipe surgical smoke evacuator with a damp cloth containing mild disinfectant solution or soapy water. 3. Wipe the surgical smoke evacuator with a clean, dry cloth. 4. Do not steam sterilize. Filters 1. Dispose according to local codes or regulations and your facility's policy. Treat fi lters as biohazardous waste (red bagged, incinerated, or otherwise per hospital protocol). Accessories 1. Dispose according to local codes or regulations and your facility's policy. Treat sterile accessories as biohaz- ardous waste (red bagged, incinerated, or otherwise per hospital protocol). BLOCKING SPLATTER Physical barriers, such as sapphire contact cooling, laser gels and plastic cones, can help trap particulate before it becomes airborne. A December 2017 study, "Airborne par- ticulate concentration during laser hair removal: A compari- son between cold sapphire with aqueous gel and cryogen skin cooling," published in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, showed that laser hair removal devices with contact cooling emit signifi cantly less particulate when compared to similar devices using cryogen spray. Emily Eshleman and Dr. Chuang, et al, found that gels used during laser hair removal procedures also help to trap particulate when they examined particulate matter emitted during alexandrite and diode laser hair removal procedures. For their paper, "Occupational exposures and determinants of ultrafi ne particle concentrations during laser hair removal procedures," published in Environmental Health in March 2017, the researchers held a smoke evacuator 12 inches from the treatment site and used an ultrasound gel called Lux Lotion to facilitate treatment when using the diode laser. They found that emissions were reduced up to 60 percent when using the gel with the diode, compared to lack of gel with the alexandrite laser. For laser tattoo removal procedures, a physical barrier such as perfl uorodecalin (PFD) patches (DESCRIBE PFD Patch, Merz Aesthetics), clear acetate shields, hydro- gel sheets or plastic cones that come with laser tattoo removal devices can protect against tattoo dye splatter- emitted particles. "Be sure to discard any contaminated tubes or cones be- tween patients; most are designed for single use," says Dr. Hruza, although he adds that some cones can be cleaned and autoclaved for reuse. DEVELOPING A PRACTICE PROTOCOL Though OSHA offers no specifi c laser plume standards, several professional organizations and government agen- cies have published position statements and voluntary standards for guidance. They include the ASLMS Position Statement, available at aslms.org; the Laser Institute of America's "American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers in Healthcare" (ANSI Z136.3 2011), available at lia. org; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Control of Smoke From Laser/Electric Surgical Procedures" (cdc.gov); and the International Council on Surgical Plume (plumecouncil.com). Take the initiative to prevent harmful compounds from entering the respiratory tracts of practitioners, patients and yourself. By developing your own best practices and proto- cols, all of your team members will breathe a little easier. Karen Appold is a freelance writer based in Pennsylvania. Physical barriers, such as sapphire contact cooling, laser gels and plastic cones, can help trap particulate before it becomes airborne.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Medesthetics - APR 2018